Testing – Leben Im Zentrum http://leben-im-zentrum.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:15:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-8.png Testing – Leben Im Zentrum http://leben-im-zentrum.org/ 32 32 Grant supports affordable testing to fight Little Cherry disease – WSU Insider https://leben-im-zentrum.org/grant-supports-affordable-testing-to-fight-little-cherry-disease-wsu-insider/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:15:54 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/grant-supports-affordable-testing-to-fight-little-cherry-disease-wsu-insider/ Washington State University will help Washington State cherry growers test more trees for the noxious little cherry disease with a block grant for specialty crops from the United States Department of Agriculture. Washington State received by the Washington State Tree Fruit Association. Named after its most distinct symptom – a small, colorless fruit – what […]]]>

Washington State University will help Washington State cherry growers test more trees for the noxious little cherry disease with a block grant for specialty crops from the United States Department of Agriculture. Washington State received by the Washington State Tree Fruit Association.

Named after its most distinct symptom – a small, colorless fruit – what growers call “Little Cherry” is a simultaneous outbreak of the Little Cherry virus-2 and disease X phytoplasma, both of which produce similar symptoms on cherry trees infected and are difficult to control. distinguish, even by experts. This is more difficult because symptoms are usually not noticed until a few weeks before harvest.

Pathogens are disseminated in orchards by small insects: the virus by mealybugs, and the phytoplasma by leafhoppers.

Tests are available to growers to find out if a tree is infected, but they can be expensive. The new $530,000 grant over three years will help expand the testing capacity of WSU’s Plant Disease Diagnostics Laboratory in Pullman with more equipment and supplies. This support will reduce testing costs by approximately 50%, to $50 per test.

“Affordable and available testing is a key part of our industry’s response to Little Cherry disease,” said Jon DeVaney, president of the WSTFA. “Washington cherry growers appreciate the support of the WSDA Specialty Crops Block Grant Program and the WSU Plant Disease Diagnostics Laboratory in this effort.”

“Active and aggressive tree removal is the best way to suppress this outbreak and prevent its spread, and testing is an essential tool for identifying trees in the early stages of infection,” said Scott Harper, virologist. of WSU and Director of Northwest Clean Factory Center. “This will help growers make informed management decisions for their orchards.”

Harper’s lab supported the first wave of testing in 2018-19, and commercial labs resumed testing in 2020, but few growers could afford to test every tree they suspected of being infected.

“WSU and collaborating labs are working hard to provide growers with testing services for Little Cherry,” said Tianna DuPont, fruit tree extension specialist at WSU. “Additional support for the WSU Plant Diagnostics Laboratory is essential to provide robust and sustainable public diagnostics so growers can quickly identify and manage the multiple issues attacking their trees.”

Prompt removal of infected trees is the best way to control the disease because there is no treatment and early removal can limit the spread of the virus to neighboring trees in an orchard, Harper said. Testing also helps avoid removing a tree that shows symptoms that look like the disease, but is not infected with small cherry pathogens.

WSU tree fruit scientists work closely with growers to fight disease and support Washington’s cherry industry, which produces more sweet cherries than any other state.

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Metro Health, City of San Antonio opens COVID-19 testing center on West Side https://leben-im-zentrum.org/metro-health-city-of-san-antonio-opens-covid-19-testing-center-on-west-side/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:22:49 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/metro-health-city-of-san-antonio-opens-covid-19-testing-center-on-west-side/ SAN ANTONIO – The doors of the Sonny Melendrez Community Center on the west side of town opened to the public on Wednesday as a COVID-19 testing site. The center is the fifth such facility to open recently as the city of San Antonio and the Metropolitan Health District step up efforts to provide more […]]]>

SAN ANTONIO – The doors of the Sonny Melendrez Community Center on the west side of town opened to the public on Wednesday as a COVID-19 testing site. The center is the fifth such facility to open recently as the city of San Antonio and the Metropolitan Health District step up efforts to provide more testing.

“As we see COVID-19 numbers continue to rise, (we) are making sure to take extra precautions,” said District 5 Councilwoman Teri Castillo.

In 2020, City Council Districts 4 and 5 have been deeply affected, not only by high numbers of COVID-19 cases, but also by deaths. Castillo said his neighborhood is part of the city where some of the most vulnerable people live.

“The stories I’ve heard from community members are that they can’t afford to get sick, so they know the vaccine can potentially have health effects where they won’t be able to go to work the next day. But they know they have to earn money to take care of their families,” Castillo said.

A d

While the number of COVID-19 infections is on the rise, the number of people in his district taking advantage of the resources available to them is also growing, Castillo said.

A resident of OneDistrict 5 said the location of the new testing site has served her and her family well, adding that the site is convenient, quick and easy.

“I think it’s very important because it’s about our health, and that way we can be healthy and know where we are in terms of being positive or negative,” district resident Herlinda Medrano said. 5.

The Sonny Melendrez Community Center is located at 5919 W. Commerce St. and will provide PCR testing services from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. days of the week. No appointment is necessary and test results are available within 24-48 hours.

Copyright 2022 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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Georgia opens mega-testing sites in Marietta, Stonecrest https://leben-im-zentrum.org/georgia-opens-mega-testing-sites-in-marietta-stonecrest/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 22:17:15 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/georgia-opens-mega-testing-sites-in-marietta-stonecrest/ Free COVID-19 tests available on mega-test sites There are sites in Cobb County and DeKalb County. The sites will remain open as long as the demand for testing creates a need. ATLANTA – As the number of COVID-19 cases rises in Georgia, health officials are responding by opening two mega testing sites on Monday. “We […]]]>

As the number of COVID-19 cases rises in Georgia, health officials are responding by opening two mega testing sites on Monday.

“We tested a record 70,047 tests last week and that does not include private testing sites and labs,” DPH director of health protection David Newton said.

“As there has been an increase in the virus, the increased demand for testing at our other sites has forced us to open more sites,” Newton said.

GEORGIA COVID-19 MEGA TEST SITES: WHERE TO GO AND OPENING HOURS

The Cobb County site is located at Jim Miller Park (Gate 1) located at 1295 Al Bishop Drive in Marietta. The DeKalb County site is located at 2994 Turner Hill Road in Stonecrest.

“If you feel like you need to get tested, or if you are advised to get tested, take a look at our website, we have testing sites all over our state,” Williams said.

Residents of both regions said the new sites filled a void.

“Last week, Christmas week, I tried and nothing… that’s when I was really sick,” recalls Marcie Okechukwu.

Ms Okechukwu struggled to find a testing site that had COVID-19 PCR testing.

CDC GUIDELINES: WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO TEST FOR COVID-19 AFTER AN EXPOSURE?

She and many others were thrilled that the Department of Health had opened two new sites in Cobb and DeKalb.

“I couldn’t, I couldn’t. I even turned to emergency care. I went online and couldn’t get an appointment because they were all booked. I’m so glad that it opened up, ”replied the DeKalb resident.

“As there has been an increase in the virus, the increased demand for testing sites also exists. This requires us to open two new sites,” commented Mr. David Newton, DPH Dir OF Heath Protection.

Health officials say the highly contagious Omicron variant, coupled with family gatherings for the holidays, has led to an increase in tests and cases.

“At Christmas, being around the family afterwards, several family members tested positive,” said Immanuel Williams, Cobb County resident.

WATCH: LIVE COVERAGE OF FOX 5 NEWS

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Omicron variant, Covid tests and Booster news: live updates https://leben-im-zentrum.org/omicron-variant-covid-tests-and-booster-news-live-updates/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 02:15:00 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/omicron-variant-covid-tests-and-booster-news-live-updates/ PictureStudents and staff at public schools in Clayton County, Ga. Waited in a line of more than 100 vehicles for coronavirus tests on Wednesday.Credit…Dustin Chambers for The New York Times Many Americans have stood in long lines at free test sites since before the Christmas and New Years holiday rush. Many more bypass the lines […]]]>
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Credit…Dustin Chambers for The New York Times

Many Americans have stood in long lines at free test sites since before the Christmas and New Years holiday rush. Many more bypass the lines and pay $ 20 or more for tests in. over-the-counter home sales – if they can find one.

Running out of options, some have gone to overcrowded emergency rooms hoping to get tested, putting themselves and others at greater risk and potentially delaying emergency care for those who are ill. and injured.

“The current demand for testing far exceeds the available testing resources,” said Michael T. Osterholm, epidemiologist and director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

This was evident this week, as many people searched for tests to take before returning to school or work. President Biden addressed the issue last month by announcing that 500 million tests would be available for free starting in January. But his administration has not given a launch date for the program, and that number of tests won’t go far in a country of some 330 million people.

Jenna Zitomer, 25, said her family of five in Westchester, NY, spent around $ 680 on rapid tests in recent months. “It’s pretty crazy, especially since it’s well over half of a salary for me,” said research scientist Ms. Zitomer. “It sounds like something we have to start budgeting every month now, like groceries or utilities. For my family, not having access to the tests could mean exposing several severely immunocompromised people to Covid-19. It basically makes it life or death.

Ms Zitomer added that at her local test center, “the lines have become so long that they have started to cancel appointments and full test days because drive-thru lines are causing problems. of circulation “.

Britt Crow-Miller, 35, a lecturer at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, said her family spent around $ 500 on home testing kits. With two adults and three children, a single ride costs around $ 100. “Who can afford that every time someone sniffs?” ” she said. “As someone lucky enough to be a good employee and have a partner who is also well employed, I am very aware that home testing is essentially a luxury.”

And yet Mrs Crow-Miller said that if one of the children “wakes up with a sore throat, I don’t feel like a responsible member of the community who sends him to school without giving him a call. first take a test “.

Elizabeth Sasser, 24, a network planning analyst living in Syracuse, NY, said her expenses for the tests – around $ 300 – were well spent. “My family has also had asymptomatic positives,” she said, “which probably would have led to more infections if it had not been for the prior purchase of home tests.”

There have been gaps in testing capacity since the start of the pandemic.

In early 2020, researchers rushed to find the swabs and fluids needed to collect and store the samples sent to labs for polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, testing, considered the gold standard for detection. viral. Backlogs in testing in the United States continued that summer, in part due to a shortage of tiny pieces of tapered plastic, called pipette tips, which are used to quickly and precisely move liquid between vials.

Equipment shortages are no longer the weakest link in the supply chain, but new problems have arisen. The first is simply that demand exceeds supply.

There is also preliminary evidence that the home antigen tests that many Americans rely on – at least as currently administered, with a nasal swab – may fail to detect some cases of Omicron over the years. first days of infection. Researchers say Omicron replicates faster or earlier in the throat and mouth than in the nose.

This could complicate the strategy to fend off the current wave, in which the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that Omicron represents 95 percent new cases.

Home testing, which can provide results within minutes, remains an important public health tool, scientists say. Positive results are particularly informative as it can take days to get PCR test results. But a negative home test should be treated with caution.

“Everyone wants these tests to do more than they can,” said Dr Osterholm.


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Astra audio: How we ignored the most popular COVID prevention – the tests https://leben-im-zentrum.org/astra-audio-how-we-ignored-the-most-popular-covid-prevention-the-tests/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 09:49:07 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/astra-audio-how-we-ignored-the-most-popular-covid-prevention-the-tests/ Audio Astra reviews recent audio reports on Kansas news, including podcasts and radio reports. Eric Thomas directs the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas. “A COVID testing crisis, once again” The Daily, December 22, 2021 Have you read the news accounts of Americans protesting against COVID-19 […]]]>

Audio Astra reviews recent audio reports on Kansas news, including podcasts and radio reports. Eric Thomas directs the Kansas Scholastic Press Association and teaches visual journalism and photojournalism at the University of Kansas.

“A COVID testing crisis, once again”

The Daily, December 22, 2021

Have you read the news accounts of Americans protesting against COVID-19 testing sites? The dozens of people painting signs and aggressively marching outside the test sites. Angry crowds of anti-testing parents disrupting school board meetings. Officials have complained about how cotton swabs implant a microchip into our unsuspecting noses.

No?

This is because testing is the most popular intervention against the virus. We find the tests a bit uncomfortable, of course. But for many Americans, it’s better than alternative COVID precautions.

Large swathes of America refuse to fully immunize, let alone schedule reminder appointments. Masking is still sometimes seen as an illegal and suffocating interference with freedom. Testing remains, at this politically divided moment, as popular as … well, I had a hard time completing that analogy because 85% of Americans supported testing about a year ago. We to disagree on anything this way these days.

Last week in Britain there was a protest against the tests. The hitting line? The demonstration was an accident. Anti-vaccination activists broke into a vaccination clinic, disrupting workers, stealing equipment and making a scene for cameras. The crowd appears to have mistaken the testing site for a vaccination location, a mistake that says more about their intellect than their message about vaccines.

But test? Everyone is asking for tests.

COVID infections hit my family this week. During the first 21 months of the pandemic, our family of four did not have a single exposure that required us to quarantine. No close contacts. No positive test. No child expelled from school.

This week was different. My family has had a positive case and countless exposures as uncles, cousins, siblings, partners, nieces, nephews and more have been infected. We texted about the tight chest, sniffle nose, cough, vomiting, and fever. My phone was vibrating with pictures of children squashed on the living room floor and positive test strips sitting on the bathroom counters. (My family’s cases here in Kansas were mild, thanks to strict adherence to vaccination recommendations.)

Even so, the power surge fed by the omicron sent me rushing for testing. Makeshift signs, sort of still on neon paper, stuck on drugstore counters explained that supermarkets and drugstores were out of testing and couldn’t predict when they would be restocked. Following President Biden’s advice, I searched on google where I could find a test nearby. The answer: Rapid tests and PCR tests weren’t available at all CVS pharmacies around me in Johnson County. The shortage continued until the CVS schedule allowed me to search.

Testing, the most popular way to fight the virus, has been sold out, the result of unlimited demand.

However, this demand was predictable. While the Biden administration can claim it was blinded by omicron, experts have long predicted that the mutations would allow for a more contagious strain – and perhaps one that could break through the protections offered by vaccines.

From “The Daily” of the New York Times, correspondent Sherly Gay Stolberg explains how the Biden team and private industry allowed test kit production to sag when we should have been stockpiling. She points out how the 500 million tests recently funded by the Biden administration will be an answer that is both too small and too late. The nature and timing of the variant couldn’t be predicted exactly, Gay Stolberg said, but the basic outlines were clear.

With more robust tests, omicron would now be less catastrophic. For those who question their symptoms or have close contact, a negative test allows them to continue a normal life. Robust tests discourage those infected from leaving the home and spreading the virus further. Instead, those with symptoms and wanting to go about their daily lives have an excuse for doing so: there aren’t enough tests.

With more robust tests, omicron would now be less catastrophic. For those who question their symptoms or have close contact, a negative test allows them to continue a normal life. Robust tests discourage those infected from leaving the home and spreading the virus further.

The testing capacity has been too low for years. Experts have been calling for ‘cheap, mediocre’ and ubiquitous testing since 2020. Michel mina of the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health appeared in the summer of 2020 at least of them different podcasts explaining his faith in daily tests that could alert Americans to their infection status. The reasoning was simple: people who know they are sick will spread the virus less often.

Why not offer free tests to all Americans? Consider the list of countries that offer free or subsidized tests: United Kingdom, Canada, France, Malaysia and Germany. According to The Guardian, the Singapore government sent 10 tests to each household between October and December, in addition to previous test shipments.

Instead, the Biden administration failed to do basic public health work to strengthen test in its first year. However, this kind of misstep was a hallmark of President Donald Trump’s response. So it’s a bit rich to hear political commentators provide exceptional scores (9 out of 5 on the crisis index?) National Review podcast. Failure to produce more tests is indeed a failure, but an isolated mistake, rather than part of a larger pattern, like Trump’s COVID denial and To grope.

Regardless of the political score, public health officials lack one of their main shields in the layered defense against the virus. At the start of the pandemic, we were armed with social distancing, masking, testing and surface disinfectant. Last year we added vaccination. With all these layers, our protections felt solid.

But now that variant is elusive, masks divide, social distancing seems odd, sanitization is toothless, and testing – our only trusted intervention – is elusive. The layered shield is frayed, if not ragged. From where, Kansas’ steep infection curve.

Under the bathroom sink, I put my family’s stash of tests away, waiting for a nose sniff or a plane ticket that calls me to use one. These are my family’s passports, giving us permission to return safely to the world. They are also a passport that every American deserves right now.

What did we miss? E-mail [email protected] to tell us about a Kansas-based audio program that would be of interest to Audio Astra players.



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Covid Live Updates: Latest Omicron Info, Tests & Cases https://leben-im-zentrum.org/covid-live-updates-latest-omicron-info-tests-cases/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 05:47:56 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/covid-live-updates-latest-omicron-info-tests-cases/ Mayor Eric Adams, right, and school chancellor David Banks welcomed children returning from vacation to a school in the Bronx on Monday.Credit…Carlo Allegri / Reuters In his first big test as mayor of New York City, Eric Adams is resisting pressure from city unions and elected officials to do more to stop the spread of […]]]>
Credit…Carlo Allegri / Reuters

In his first big test as mayor of New York City, Eric Adams is resisting pressure from city unions and elected officials to do more to stop the spread of the coronavirus as cases and hospitalizations rise.

Mr Adams firmly maintains that schools must remain open and he urges employers to return employees to their offices, despite calls from some union leaders to temporarily return to virtual learning and remote work.

With coronavirus cases increasing rapidly in recent days, a small but growing list of public school districts across the country – including Newark, Atlanta, Milwaukee and Cleveland – have temporarily switched to distance learning. On Monday evening, the Philadelphia School District announced that 81 schools, out of 216, would be distant.

In an interview on CNN Tuesday morning, Adams defended his decision to reopen schools, even though about a third of parents did not send their children back to class on Monday for the start of semester. He continued to argue that students were safer at school.

“I will not let hysteria prevent the future of my children from receiving a quality education”, Mr. Adams said on CNN.

On Tuesday, President Biden, citing the lack of evidence that Omicron affects children more severely, called for schools to remain open in the United States. Local officials should use federal funds from the stimulus package passed last year to improve ventilation systems in schools and support classrooms large enough for social distancing, he said.

“We have no reason to believe at this point that Omicron is worse for children than previous variants,” Mr. Biden said. “We know our children can be safe at school.”

Mr Adams, a Democrat who was sworn in on Saturday just after the New Years’ Ball fell in Times Square, also urged companies don’t allow employees to work remotely, echoing a message he transmitted to Bloomberg TV on Monday: “You can’t run New York from your home.”

Mr Adams insisted on Tuesday that he was not at war with the teachers’ union and its president, Michael Mulgrew, who had called for a temporary return to distance education.

“There is no battle between Michael Mulgrew and Eric Adams,” Adams said, adding that they talk to each other three times a day and work together to keep classrooms safe.

Mr Adams has repeatedly argued that schools in the city must remain open and that poor children in particular suffer from distance learning. He recently announced, alongside his predecessor and the governor, a plan to distribute millions of rapid home tests to schools and increase random surveillance tests among students.

New York City reported nearly 30,000 new cases of the virus on Monday and the number of people hospitalized has has exceeded 5,000, according to state data. This level exceeds the peak of last winter, but remains below the hospitalization rate during the first wave of the pandemic in 2020, when 12,000 people were hospitalized on the worst days.

There are long lines outside testing centers, as they have been for weeks, and many private companies have said their employees should continue to work from home.

Some public officials have called for more aggressive measures to stop the spread of the virus, including Mark D. Levine, the new Manhattan Borough President who has become a leading voice in amplifying the opinions of health experts.

Mr. Levine released a 16-point plan on Monday that called on the city to encourage New Yorkers to avoid large gatherings, to temporarily allow city workers to work from home and to require masks in all indoor environments for vaccinated and unvaccinated New Yorkers.

“We must act now to slow this tide, protect our hospitals and support the sick,” he said.

His plan received support from leaders including Randi Weingarten, the leader of the country’s most powerful teachers’ union, and Ron T. Kim, a member of the Queens State Assembly.

In September, then-mayor Bill de Blasio ordered city employees who worked from home to return to the office. The city has more than 300,000 workers and around 80,000 of those working in offices who have been allowed to work remotely have had to return.

As coronavirus cases started to skyrocket in December, the city’s largest union representing workers called on Mr de Blasio to implement a remote policy for employees who can do their work from home. On Tuesday, a spokesperson for the union, District Council 37, said it would continue to push Mr Adams to adopt a policy from a distance.

“Our non-essential members have proven they can do their work from home,” said spokesperson Freddi Goldstein. “There is no reason to keep them in the office at the risk of their health.”

Mr Adams, who is close to the leaders of District Council 37, said he would discuss the policy with the unions.



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Ohio State, CAS Open New COVID-19 Driving Test Site https://leben-im-zentrum.org/ohio-state-cas-open-new-covid-19-driving-test-site/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 05:06:09 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/ohio-state-cas-open-new-covid-19-driving-test-site/ COLUMBUS, Ohio – In response to latest wave of COVID-19 in central Ohio, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is teaming up with CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, to open new site COVID-19 driving test today. The new test site is located on the first floor of the CAS parking lot at […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio – In response to latest wave of COVID-19 in central Ohio, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is teaming up with CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, to open new site COVID-19 driving test today.

The new test site is located on the first floor of the CAS parking lot at 2540 Olentangy River Road, Columbus. It will have the capacity to test up to 1,000 people every day. Testing services will be offered Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 8 a.m. to noon. COVID-19 tests will be open to the entire community by appointment only.

“We know testing is an important tool in our battle against COVID-19,” said Dr. Andrew Thomas, interim co-leader and clinical director of Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “We remain committed to supporting the central Ohio community and responding to the growing demand for COVID-19 testing. At this point, our goal is to test people with symptoms of COVID-19 and those with significant exposure to people known to have COVID-19. Knowing your COVID status can help you avoid spreading this virus to family members, friends, and other people you have close contact with. “

Starting Monday, January 3, anyone with an Ohio State MyChart account will be able to schedule a COVID-19 test on their own at the new CAS site. For those who do not have a MyChart account or would like to schedule a test at another Ohio State Wexner Medical Center testing site, please call your Ohio State health care provider or the COVID call center at 614-293-4000 to schedule your test.

The new drive-thru test site will replace the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center’s COVID-19 test site at 650 Ackerman Road. It will be made up of the clinical team from Ohio State Wexner Medical Center as well as 10 members of the Ohio National Guard who are among those deployed by Ohio Governor Mike DeWine to help healthcare facilities in the Ohio to respond to the winter spike in COVID-19 cases.

“On behalf of all of my colleagues at CAS, we are proud to partner with the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center to provide this vital community service aimed at improving health, wellness and safety,” said Manuel Guzman, president of CASE. “It’s another example that when we join forces to strengthen our community, we can have an even greater impact together. “

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Media Contact: Serena Smith, Wexner Medical Center Media Relations, Serena.Smith@osumc.edu


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Where to find COVID-19 tests on New Years Day in the DC area https://leben-im-zentrum.org/where-to-find-covid-19-tests-on-new-years-day-in-the-dc-area/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 14:11:24 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/where-to-find-covid-19-tests-on-new-years-day-in-the-dc-area/ If you’re looking to get tested for COVID-19 in the DC area on New Years Day, you’re out of luck; there are still places open and ready for business. If you’re looking to get tested for COVID-19 in the DC area on New Years Day, you’re out of luck; there are still places open and […]]]>

If you’re looking to get tested for COVID-19 in the DC area on New Years Day, you’re out of luck; there are still places open and ready for business.

If you’re looking to get tested for COVID-19 in the DC area on New Years Day, you’re out of luck; there are still places open and ready for business.

Although most testing centers are closed for the holidays, you can get tested at the following locations:

CC

“DC Test Yourself” drop boxes will be open to residents to drop off samples for rapid testing from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. but will be closed for PCR testing.

Engines 4, 8, 31 and 33 will be open for landing tests from noon to 4 p.m.

The addresses of the motors are as follows:

  • Engine 4 is located at 2531 Sherman Ave NW
  • Engine 8 is located at 1520 C St SE
  • Engine 31 is located at 4930 Connecticut Ave NW
  • Engine 33 is located at 101 Atlantic St SEcovi

Maryland

Governor Larry Hogan announced the opening of two additional COVID-19 test sites which offer tests from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on New Year’s Day. Only walks will be accepted.

The sites will offer laboratory PCR tests. PCR test results typically take 24-48 hours, and site testing is free. The sites are located at:

  • UM Upper Chesapeake Health: 500 Upper Chesapeake Drive in Bel Air
  • Anne Arundel Medical Center: South Pavilion, 2001 Medical Parkway in Annapolis

FirstCall Urgent Care at Maple Lawn will see and test “extremely sick” patients from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and will not test for COVID-19 for those who are asymptomatic on New Years Day.

Virginia

COVID-19 test for Symptomatic Fairfax County Public Schools students and staff will be at South County High School on Saturday January 1.

Fairfax Medical Laboratory is open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. for testing. Both walk-in and walk-in appointments are available for New Years Day.


More news on the coronavirus

Looking for more information? DC, Maryland, and Virginia each publish more data every day. Visit their official websites here: Virginia | Maryland | CC


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Demand for COVID-19 testing leads to increased traffic in South Lamar https://leben-im-zentrum.org/demand-for-covid-19-testing-leads-to-increased-traffic-in-south-lamar/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:12:16 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/demand-for-covid-19-testing-leads-to-increased-traffic-in-south-lamar/ AUSTIN (KXAN) – If you’ve recently driven south on South Lamar Boulevard near Bluebonnet Lane, you’ve probably noticed a multitude of cars with flashing lights on in the right lane. As the city of Austin returns to Stage 4 COVID-19 risk levels and the omicron variant sweeps through central Texas, demands for testing have increased […]]]>

AUSTIN (KXAN) – If you’ve recently driven south on South Lamar Boulevard near Bluebonnet Lane, you’ve probably noticed a multitude of cars with flashing lights on in the right lane.

As the city of Austin returns to Stage 4 COVID-19 risk levels and the omicron variant sweeps through central Texas, demands for testing have increased dramatically in the region. This is the kind of demand that clinics like Grand Ave Pharmacy strive to stay on top of in their drugstores and mobile testing sites.

But with increased interest in COVID-19 testing, long queues and saved traffic, as seen at the South Lamar Driving Mobile Clinic of Grand Ave Pharmacy and the Driving Pop-up Clinic of Nomi Health at the Long Center.

“A month ago, [Grand Ave Pharmacy locations] were doing between 700 or even 600 to 700 tests a day, that was pretty average, ”said pharmacist and owner Dr Chris Adlakha. “Right now we’re producing between 5,000 and 7,000 a day. “

This spike in testing requests correlates with a significant increase in the positivity rate among test samples collected by Grand Ave Pharmacy, he said. For the majority of the pandemic, Adlakha said 1-3% of tests performed would come back positive; now that range is hovering closer to 15-20%.

A 24-hour drive-thru pharmacy on S. Lamar Boulevard has seen an increase in demands for testing amid the spread of the omicron variant. The Grand Ave Pharmacy, which oversees the clinic site, said their locations average between 5,000 and 7,000 tests per day.
(KXAN Photo / Billy Gates)

To meet demand, Grand Ave Pharmacy operates around the clock off South Lamar and has staggered staff shifts, Adlakha said. However, the effects of these long queues are now being felt on some businesses in the region in the form of increased congestion and, at times, limited access for customers to enter their parking lots.

“I know we have had traffic problems with lines and people trying to take a test,” Adlakha said, later adding: “We are trying. We are working directly with the city, we are working with the control of the traffic and even with the police, everyone really came together to try to make this as efficient as possible.

In the middle of traffic, a sign placed in front of Sukha Yoga and Maha Coffee asks those looking for COVID-19 tests to refrain from blocking their parking lots. Even though she has spent hours personally directing traffic away from her stores, owner Erinn Leigh said she believes it still costs hundreds of lost revenue every week.

“Whether it’s here on South Lamar or anywhere else around Austin right now, [city and pharmacy leaders] really should think about the future as it would save everyone a lot of stress, a lot of fuss and a lot of communication problems.

erinn leigh, owner, sukha yoga and maha coffee

Leigh and her partner, Mark Herron, have been business owners in South Lamar for more than seven years, two of which have spent overcoming the hurdles of the coronavirus pandemic. But when Lamar’s queues started blocking entrances to her studio and cafe about two weeks ago, she said it exacerbated an already difficult time for small businesses.

She said she spent hours driving traffic away from her parking lot to greet customers trying to get in and out. Still, she said the 24-hour nature of the testing site, coupled with the normal morning and evening rush hours, made the past two weeks chaotic.

As to how to remedy this situation, Leigh said it would take a concerted effort on the part of those tested, as well as city and pharmacy leaders, to alleviate the situation.

“It takes a group effort. People who drive need to be careful and mindful of their surroundings, but more importantly, the city of Austin needs to realize that our tax dollars are going to provide support, and therefore they should bring someone here. to help the company that runs the test sites, ”she said. “Whether it’s here in South Lamar or anywhere else around Austin right now, they should really think about the future because it would save everyone a lot of stress, a lot of fuss and a lot of trouble. communication.”

Currently, Adlakha has said that a combination of Austin police officers and private security services are operating at test sites to facilitate movement. He said between three and six security guards or guards are stationed at each location of the facility.

Adlakha added that he met with city transport staff and a city permit official on Wednesday to review the site plans and develop a more effective strategy to direct traffic through the facility and minimize its traffic. impact on roads.

“The last thing we want to do is have the business of another business be negatively affected by people trying to take a COVID test,” he said.

City officials of the 3-1-1 service confirmed receiving a service request related to traffic safeguards near the test facility. In an emailed statement, officials from the Austin Department of Transportation said the city is working with clinic leaders to combat the impacts of traffic around the Long Center and South Lamar.

“Austin Transportation staff are working with COVID-19 test providers to help them keep operations running smoothly while ensuring public safety,” officials said, adding, “near the COVID test location -19 from Bluebonnet Lane and South Lamar Boulevard, the supplier will adjust its operations for after afternoon rush hours and employ officers to better direct traffic. “

As for the changes she hopes to see implemented, Leigh called on city and drugstore leaders to expand officers’ presence to help control and direct traffic. She also suggested redirecting the clinic entrance to Bluebonnet Lane, where there is on-street parking where people can queue rather than an active traffic lane.

“I think the city, as well as the private company that runs the test site, should collaborate and use their resources to support everyone affected along this route and really come up with something different,” he said. she declared. “Especially if we’re going to be living with COVID. It’s not necessarily going to go away, and so we have to learn to live with it in a more normalized way so that we can go on living and not be in these heightened states of chaos. “


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Covid News: Daily record for US cases broken https://leben-im-zentrum.org/covid-news-daily-record-for-us-cases-broken/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 06:06:00 +0000 https://leben-im-zentrum.org/covid-news-daily-record-for-us-cases-broken/ A drive-thru test site in Baldwin Park, Calif., Monday. The Omicron variant became dominant in the United States last week, not the previous week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Credit…Bing Guan / Reuters The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that the Omicron variant now accounts for about 59% of […]]]>
Credit…Bing Guan / Reuters

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that the Omicron variant now accounts for about 59% of all Covid cases in the United States, a significant decrease from the agency’s previous estimate. The update shows how difficult it is to keep up with the fast-spreading variant in real time and how poorly the agency has communicated its uncertainty, experts said.

Last week, the CDC said Omicron accounted for about 73% of variants circulating in the United States during the week ending December 18. But in its review, the agency said the variant accounted for around 23% of cases that week.

In other words, Delta, which has dominated U.S. infections since the summer, was still ruling the United States that week. This could mean that a significant number of current hospitalizations for Covid were due to infections from Delta, Dr Scott Gottlieb, former Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, suggested on Twitter. Hospitalizations usually delay several weeks after the initial infections.

Experts said they weren’t surprised by the revisions, given that the CDC’s estimates are rough guesses, with a wide range of possible values ​​known as “confidence intervals.” Omicron cases can only be confirmed by genetic sequencing, which is only done on a portion of the samples across the country.

And Omicron is still spreading extremely quickly.

Still, they said the CDC had done a poor job of communicating the uncertainty of its estimates. The agency has had a series of missteps during the pandemic, including sending botched tests early and changing masking guidelines. When on Monday he halved the recommended isolation period to five days for those who test positive but show no symptoms, critics objected that there was no requirement to test before returning to the hospital. job.

Dr Jerome Adams, who served as U.S. surgeon general under former President Donald J. Trump, wrote on Twitter Tuesday that while he respected the CDC, he disagreed with its decision on periods of isolation.

He also criticized the lack of a test option or recommendation for better quality masks in the new guide.

David O’Connor, a virologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said of Omicron’s estimate: “The 73% received a lot more attention than the confidence intervals, and I think that’s is just one example of how scientists try to project an air of confidence into what’s to come.

Dr O’Connor said he initially thought the initial estimate “seemed high”. The agency came up with an estimate based on a “relatively small number of sequences,” he added.

“It’s like playing Name That Tune and trying to tell, based only on the first note, whether the song is ‘Ice Ice Baby’ by Vanilla Ice, or ‘Under Pressure’,” Dr O’Connor said. . “Without more data, it can be very difficult to know which one it’s going to be. “

The new estimate of 59% is also a rough calculation, experts said, and will most likely be revised in the coming weeks.

“I just want people to know that this is an estimate, which is not actually from sequence confirmed cases,” said Nathan Grubaugh, epidemiologist at the Yale School of Public Health. “With Omicron in particular, it’s been very difficult to have projections because things change so quickly.”

Dr Grubaugh, who tracks probable samples from Omicron in Connecticut, said the variant accounted for over 80% of cases there, although he also notes that the country is heterogeneous and the variant likely has a different prevalence in different places.

“I don’t know how the CDC built their algorithm, but humans created these programs, and humans are fallible,” said Massimo Caputi, molecular virologist at Florida Atlantic University School of Medicine. “At the end of the day, you can predict as much as you want, but you have to look at the numbers you have on hand.”

Dr O’Connor, who follows Omicron in Wisconsin, said the variant accounted for half of the cases on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus in just three days. “If I was making a betting prediction it wasn’t so much that the 73 percent number was wrong, but the timing of it was wrong,” he said.

These predictions will likely become more accurate over time as more data on Omicron is collected.

More precise figures will be needed to intelligently distribute Covid treatments. One of Omicron’s big challenges is the variant’s ability to thwart two of the three monoclonal antibody treatments, which can prevent serious illness in Covid-19 patients. Thus, some hospitals have started to reduce these treatments; administrators from NewYork-Presbyterian, NYU Langone and Mount Sinai have all said they will stop giving patients the two treatments that are ineffective against Omicron. But the drugs could still help those infected with Delta.

“If you still have these Delta cases, stopping the monoclonal drugs means that not everyone who would have benefited from them will get them at all,” said Dr O’Connor.

Dr O’Connor said scientists and healthcare providers need to do a better job of communicating the uncertainty of the predictions they share with the public. “Having the humility to recognize that there is a lot that no one knows that is unknowable right now is going to be really important.”



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